CISG Sponsored Sessions in AAG 2011

 

Tuesday

Web GIS: The Past, Present, and Future – Workshop is scheduled on Tuesday, 4/12/11, from 9:00 AM – 12:00 PM, in Capitol Hill, Sheraton Hotel
Open Source Tools in GISc Research and Education (I) is scheduled on Tuesday, 4/12/2011, from 12:40 PM – 2:20 PM in 206 – Washington State Convention Center, Level 2
Spatial Cloud Computing Workshop is scheduled on Tuesday, 4/12/11, from 1:00 PM – 4:00 PM, in Capitol Hill, Sheraton Hotel
Open Source Tools in GISc Research and Education (II) is scheduled on Tuesday, 4/12/2011, from 2:40 PM – 4:20 PM in 206 – Washington State Convention Center, Level 2
Educating a Workforce Literate in Cyberinfrastructure is scheduled on Tuesday, 4/12/2011, from 4:40 PM – 6:20 PM in 206 – Washington State Convention Center, Level 2

Wednesday


Spatial Cloud Computing: Paper Session I Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS)
 is scheduled on Wednesday, 4/13/2011, from 8:00 AM – 9:40 AMin 609 – Washington State Convention Center, Level 6
Spatial Cloud Computing (SCC): Platform as a Service (PaaS) and Software as a Service (SaaS) is scheduled on Wednesday, 4/13/2011, from 10:00 AM – 11:40 AM in 609 – Washington State Convention Center, Level 6
The Cloud as a Platform for Platforms – Cloud Computing for Geographers is scheduled on Wednesday, 4/13/2011, from 11:50 AM – 12:30 PM in 609 – Washington State Convention Center, Level 6
Spatial Cloud Computing (SCC): How could geographers use and help to shape cloud computing? is scheduled on Wednesday, 4/13/2011, from 12:40 PM – 2:20 PM in 609 – Washington State Convention Center, Level 6

Thursday

Web Service Technology for GISciences is scheduled on Thursday, 4/14/2011, from 8:00 AM – 9:40 AM in 308 – Washington State Convention Center, Level 3
Online visualization for geospatial sciences is scheduled on Thursday, 4/14/2011, from 10:00 AM – 11:40 AM in 308 – Washington State Convention Center, Level 3
CyberGIS Research Agenda is scheduled on Thursday, 4/14/2011, from 12:40 PM – 2:20 PM in Douglas Room – Sheraton Hotel, Second Floor
Agency Perspectives on CyberGIS is scheduled on Thursday, 4/14/2011, from 2:40 PM – 4:20 PM in Douglas Room – Sheraton Hotel, Second Floor
CyberGIS Trends is scheduled on Thursday, 4/14/2011, from 4:40 PM – 6:20 PM in Douglas Room – Sheraton Hotel, Second Floor
Cyberinfrasturcture Specialty Group Business Meeting is scheduled on Thursday, 4/14/2011, from 8:00 PM – 9:00 PM in 308 – Washington State Convention Center, Level 3

Friday

Spatial Analysis and Volunteered Geographic Information (VGI) is scheduled on Friday, 4/15/2011, from 8:00 AM – 9:40 AM in Willow A – Sheraton Hotel, Second Floor
Geoweb for Community Development: Case Studies and Theory is scheduled on Friday, 4/15/2011, from 8:00 AM – 9:40 AM in Queen Anne – Sheraton Hotel, Union Tower, Third Floor
Computational Geography is scheduled on Friday, 4/15/2011, from 10:00 AM – 11:40 AM in Queen Anne – Sheraton Hotel, Union Tower, Third Floor
Geospatial Semantics and Ontology is scheduled on Friday, 4/15/2011, from 12:40 PM – 2:20 PM in Queen Anne – Sheraton Hotel, Union Tower, Third Floor

Saturday

GIS and Citizen Science: Methods and Tools (Session 1) is scheduled on Saturday, 4/16/2011, from 8:00 AM – 9:40 AM in 301 – Washington State Convention Center, Level 3
GIS and Citizen Science: Methods and Tools (Session 2) is scheduled on Saturday, 4/16/2011, from 10:00 AM – 11:40 AM in 301 – Washington State Convention Center, Level 3
Virtual Communities is scheduled on Saturday, 4/16/2011, from 12:00 PM – 1:40 PM in 301 – Washington State Convention Center, Level 3

 

Sessions

  • Online visualization for geospatial sciences

3231 Online visualization for geospatial sciences is scheduled on Thursday, 4/14/2011, from 10:00 AM – 11:40 AM in 308 – Washington State Convention Center, Level 3

Due to the distribution of geospatial data, services, and computing resources, a new visualization paradigm, online visualization, has been proposed to address the visualization and analytics of these resources over the internet. The online visualization is a process that distributes the components of visualization pipeline to different computers to accomplish a visualization task. A notable example is the utilization of virtual globes such as Google Earth, Bing Maps to promote the understanding of geospatial dynamics. This session is to capture research, development, application, and other practices of online visualization in geospatial domain.

Organizers:
Jing Li
Joint Center for Intelligent Spatial Computing
Geography and Geoinformation Science, George Mason University
Email: jlih@gmu.edu

Dr. Huayi Wu
Associate director
Joint Center for Intelligent Spatial Computing
Geography and Geoinformation Science, George Mason University
Email: hwu8@gmu.edu

  • Educating a Workforce Literate in Cyberinfrastructure

1641 Educating a Workforce Literate in Cyberinfrastructure is scheduled on Tuesday, 4/12/2011, from 4:40 PM – 6:20 PM in 206 – Washington State Convention Center, Level 2

Geographic cyberinfrastructure is enabling powerful opportunities to: i) collaborate, ii) model and visualize complex geospatial concepts, iii) create and discover geographic and educational resources for use in formal and informal settings, iv) assess learning gains, and v) personalize learning environments. These changes require a new level of technical competence in the geographic workforce and in our citizenry at large. Imagine an interdisciplinary course in the design and construction of large public works projects attracting student-faculty teams from multiple disciplines (urban planning, environmental science, economics, etc.) and from around the globe. To develop an understanding, the students combine relatively small self-contained digital simulations that capture both simple behavior and geometry to model more complex geospatial phenomena.

A networked learning environment increases the impact and accessibility of all resources by allowing students to search for and discover content, to assemble curricular and learning modules from component pieces in a flexible manner, and to communicate and collaborate with others, leading to a deep change in the relationship between students and knowledge. Indeed, students experience the profound changes in the practice of geography and the nature of inquiry that cyberinfrastructure provokes.

Organizers:
Rob Raskin
Instrument Software and Science Data Systems Section
Jet Propulsion Laboratory
Email: robert.g.raskin@jpl.nasa.gov

  • GIS and Citizen Science: Methods and Tools (Session 1 and 2)

5124 GIS and Citizen Science: Methods and Tools (Session 1) is scheduled on Saturday, 4/16/2011, from 8:00 AM – 9:40 AM in 301 – Washington State Convention Center, Level 3

5224 GIS and Citizen Science: Methods and Tools (Session 2)is scheduled on Saturday, 4/16/2011, from 10:00 AM – 11:40 AM in 301 – Washington State Convention Center, Level 3The diffusion of web2.0 technologies has enabled broader citizen participation in scientific activities. One significant example is the explosion of user-generated contents available online with explicit geographic information. Examples are Wikimapia, Google Maps/Earth mashups, and OpenStreetMap. Geographic information can also be found in the contents of blogs, Flickr photos, and YouTube videos. The phenomenon is generally termed volunteered geographic information (VGI). The potential of applying citizen science applications, such as those enabled by VGI, to widely incorporate efforts from citizens for scientific and management activities has been recognized by researchers. One of the grand challenges to fulfill the potential is developing and evaluating techniques for synthesizing and analyzing citizen contributions. The sheer volume and complexity of such contributions make the processing of non-traditional geospatial data beyond the capacities of traditional GIS. Advancements in geospatial computing suggest new tools and methods to address the challenge of synthesizing and analyzing citizen generated data. While traditional GIS is a tightly coupled system for collecting, processing, analyzing, archiving, and visualizing geographic data, geospatial computing decouples the system and distributes computing tasks to distributed components, which are connected via data and service communication. The purpose of this session is to investigate the methods and tools of “geospatial computing” as as solution to address the challenge of incorporating citizen science into framework of GIScience.

Organizer(s):
Dr. Chen Xu
Joint Center for Intelligent Spatial Computing
Geography and Geoinformation Science, George Mason University
Email: cxu3@gmu.edu

  • Computational Geography

4273 Computational Geography is scheduled on Friday, 4/15/2011, from 10:00 AM – 11:40 AM in Queen Anne – Sheraton Hotel, Union Tower, Third Floor

Many geographic problems pose computational challenges which originate from three aspects which include a) data intensity, b) computational intensity, and c) massive concurrent users. High Performance Computing (HPC) is able to integrate enormous heterogeneous parallel and distributed computational resources and can therefore provide various potential solutions to the computing demands. GIScience problems can be solved by effectively and efficiently harnessing the heterogeneous distributed computing resources, but spatially optimized parallel and distributed processing strategies must be developed to handle the problems associated with communication, memory management, synchronization, and load balancing. Conventional HPC approaches to GIS and spatial analysis focus directly on decomposing spatial data structures and operations and utilizing them in specific parallel computer architectural implementations. There is an urgent need to investigate how HPC can be better utilized to address geographic science problems regionally and globally.

The High Performance Computing for Geographic Science session is organized to capture innovation in HPC technology to resolve geographic science problems and to promote advances in modeling methodologies and simulation. Topics of particular interest are, but are not restricted to:

  1. Grid Computing & Cloud Computing
  2. Large Scale Simulation/Prediction
  3. Modeling of Geographic Science phenomena supported by HPC
  4. Spatial analysis and processing supported by HPC
  5. 3D or 4D Visualization supported by HPC
  6. Parallel algorithms, methodologies, and strategies
  7. Load balancing, middleware and task scheduling methods leveraged for earth science applications
  8. High Performance Software Tools
  9. Data intensive problems supported by HPCOrganizer(s):Qingfeng Guan
    Assistant Professor
    Center for Advanced Land Management Information Technologies
    School of Natural Resources
    University of Nebraska Lincoln
    Email: qguan2@unlnotes.unl.edu

    Eric Shook
    CyberInfrastructure and Geospatial Information Laboratory (CIGI)
    University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
    Email: eshook2@illinois.edu

    Qunying Huang,
    Joint Center for Intelligent Spatial Computing
    George Mason University
    Email: qhuang1@gmu.edu

 

  • Geoweb for Community Development: Case Studies and Theory

4173 Geoweb for Community Development: Case Studies and Theory is scheduled on Friday, 4/15/2011, from 8:00 AM – 9:40 AM in Queen Anne – Sheraton Hotel, Union Tower, Third Floor

The Geoweb is an online framework for collecting, distributing, and using geospatial data in a collaborative manner. Built on the development of free or low cost online mapping platforms, the provision of “open” government data, and the acknowledgement that individuals can provide information based on their own experience (volunteered geographic information, or VGI), the Geoweb has implications for how information is created and channeled between citizen and government. For example, recent Apps for Democracy (http://www.appsfordemocracy.org) contests have generated applications leveraging government data to improve service delivery to citizens and support decision-making.

Considering the impact of this flow of information, the Geoweb has potential to influence the community development process. For example, how does the Geoweb allow citizens or community groups to argue or advocate their perspective to levels of government? How may VGI be used in the community development process? What happens when VGI directly contradicts (or strongly supports) existing government data? Who is empowered and who is disempowered? Which divides are shattered and which persist?

As an emerging area of study, there is little research documenting the application of the Geoweb within a community development context. This paper session presents a forum for the discussion and identification of mutually encountered challenges and benefits, gathering the lessons learned from experiences in the field.

Organizer(s):

Renee Sieber
Department of Geography
McGill University

Peter Johnson
Department of Geography
McGill University
Email: peter.johnson2@mail.mcgill.ca

  • Open Source Tools in GISc Research and Education (I and II)

1441 Open Source Tools in GISc Research and Education (I) is scheduled on Tuesday, 4/12/2011, from 12:40 PM – 2:20 PM in 206 – Washington State Convention Center, Level 2

1541 Open Source Tools in GISc Research and Education (II) is scheduled on Tuesday, 4/12/2011, from 2:40 PM – 4:20 PM in 206 – Washington State Convention Center, Level 2

Seamless access to and the fusion of disparate geographic information sources, geographic and scientific visualizations, and geocomputations have been common challenges in scientific research across disciplines. To cope with these challenges in GISc research and education, open source platforms and tools from research communities (e.g., GRASS, pySAL, OpenGeoDa, Kepler, R, R-Geo, GeoTools, uDig, PostGIS, to name a few) and open GIS standards (e.g., OGC WMS, WFS, WCS, GML, KML standards, etc.) are gaining more attention in building a scientific research infrastructure and introducing more effective teaching tools. This session invites papers on state-of-the-art applications of open source tools in GISc research, and in particular, welcomes papers on best practices in GISc education. Potential topics for this session include, but are not limited to:

  • State of the art developments/applications of open source tools in GISc research and education
  • Best practices on the use of open source tools in GISc research and education
  • Implementations of a research infrastructure using open source tools in GISc

To present a paper in the session:

  1. Register and submit your abstract online (http://www.aag.org/cs/annualmeeting).
  2. Email your presenter identification number (PIN), paper title, and abstract to luc.anselin@asu.edu, s.jang75@csuohio.edu, and Sergio.Rey@asu.edu by October 20, 2010

Organizer(s):
Luc Anselin
GeoDa Center for Geospatial Analysis and Computation
Arizona State University
Email: luc.anselin@asu.edu

Sung-Gheel (Gil) Jang
Department of Urban Studies
Cleveland State University
Email: s.jang75@csuohio.edu

Sergio Rey
School of Geographical Sciences & Urban Planning
Arizona State University
Email: Sergio.Rey@asu.edu

  • Virtual Communities

5324 Virtual Communities is scheduled on Saturday, 4/16/2011, from 12:00 PM – 1:40 PM in 301 – Washington State Convention Center, Level 3

Many geographic researchers engage in collaborative activities that serve as virtual communities, often with the assistance of social networking tools, such as Facebook or MySpace. They might share access to world-class resources spanning experimental facilities and field equipment, distributed instrumentation, sensor networks and arrays, mobile research platforms, high-performance computing systems, data collections, sophisticated analysis and visualization facilities, and advanced simulation tools. The convergence of information, grid, and networking technologies with contemporary communications now enables communities to pursue their research and learning goals in real-time and without limitations related to location. The creation of end-to-end cyberinfrastructure systems – comprehensive networked resources – by groups of individuals with common interests is permitting the establishment of virtual communities that are revolutionizing the conduct of research and education.

A virtual community is created by a group of individuals whose members and resources may be dispersed geographically and/or temporally, yet who function as a coherent unit through the use of end-to-end cyberinfrastructure systems. These systems provide shared access to centralized or distributed resources and services, often in real-time. Such virtual organizations supporting distributed communities go by numerous names: collaboratory, co-laboratory, grid community, science gateway, science portal, etc.

Organizer(s):
Rob Raskin
Instrument Software and Science Data Systems Section
Jet Propulsion Laboratory
Email: robert.g.raskin@jpl.nasa.gov

  • Web Service Technology for GISciences

3131 Web Service Technology for GISciences is scheduled on Thursday, 4/14/2011, from 8:00 AM – 9:40 AM in 308 – Washington State Convention Center, Level 3

Web service technology and Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) provide the mechanism to share data, methods, and tools as Internet-based components published using standard interface and description languages, and are universally available via interoperable communication protocols. In the GIScience community, this becomes particularly important and difficult due to the nature that GIS data are large and usually heterogeneous in conceptual model, format, reference system, database and the hosting computing environments.

Organizer(s):

Huayi Wu, Ph.D.
CISC
George Mason University
Email: hwu8@gmu.edu

Xuan Shi, Ph.D.
Center for GIS
Georgia Institute of Technology
Email: Xuan.Shi@coa.gatech.edu

  • Spatial Cloud Computing (SCC): How could geographers use and help to shape cloud computing?

2409 Spatial Cloud Computing (SCC): How could geographers use and help to shape cloud computing? is scheduled on Wednesday, 4/13/2011, from 12:40 PM – 2:20 PM in 609 – Washington State Convention Center, Level 6

Cloud computing is becoming the next generation IT solution for saving resources and conducting green computing. Government agencies are investigating cloud computing for their information technology needs in the following years. We employ the term of Spatial Cloud Computing (SCC) to capture the relationships and characteristics between GIS and Cloud computing. Pioneering projects are being conducted to investigate how geospatial applications can leverage cloud computing for provide reliability and scalability. For example, Microsoft is utilizing Azure Platform as a Service (PaaS) to support Earth, Environment, and Energy program within its external research. FGDC is conducting the GeoCloud Sandbox initiative with multiple agencies to develop common geospatial Platform as a Service (PaaS) solution. NASA is conducting Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS), spatial cloud computing and Data as a Service (DaaS) to investigate how cloud computing can be utilized for geospatial sciences and how to use geospatial principles to optimize cloud computing for serving a variety of dynamic user requirements.

Organizer(s):

Chaowei Yang
George Mason University
Email: cyang3@gmu.edu

Chair:
Michael Goodchild
University of California – Santa Barbara Email: good@geog.ucsb.edu

  • Spatial Cloud Computing (SCC): Platform as a Service (PaaS) and Software as a Service (SaaS)

2409 Spatial Cloud Computing (SCC): Platform as a Service (PaaS) and Software as a Service (SaaS) is scheduled on Wednesday, 4/13/2011, from 10:00 AM – 11:40 AM in 609 – Washington State Convention Center, Level 6

Cloud computing is becoming the next generation IT solution for saving resources and conducting green computing. Government agencies are investigating cloud computing for their information technology needs in the following years. We employ the term of Spatial Cloud Computing (SCC) to capture the relationships and characteristics between GIS and Cloud computing. Pioneering projects are being conducted to investigate how geospatial applications can leverage cloud computing for provide reliability and scalability. For example, Microsoft is utilizing Azure Platform as a Service (PaaS) to support Earth, Environment, and Energy program within its external research. FGDC is conducting the GeoCloud Sandbox initiative with multiple agencies to develop common geospatial Platform as a Service (PaaS) solution. NASA is conducting Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS), spatial cloud computing and Data as a Service (DaaS) to investigate how cloud computing can be utilized for geospatial sciences and how to use geospatial principles to optimize cloud computing for serving a variety of dynamic user requirements.

Organizer(s):

Chaowei Yang
George Mason University
Email: cyang3@gmu.edu

Robert Raskin
Group Supervisor, Science Data Engineering and Archiving
Instrument Software and Science Data Systems Section
Jet Propulsion Laboratory
Pasadena, CA 91109
Email: raskin@jpl.nasa.gov

Chair:
Dawn Wright
Oregon State University
Email: dawn@science.oregonstate.edu

  • Spatial Cloud Computing (SCC): Paper Session I Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS)

2109 Spatial Cloud Computing: Paper Session I Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) is scheduled on Wednesday, 4/13/2011, from 8:00 AM – 9:40 AM in 609 – Washington State Convention Center, Level 6

Cloud computing is becoming the next generation IT solution for saving resources and conducting green computing. Government agencies are investigating cloud computing for their information technology needs in the following years. We employ the term of Spatial Cloud Computing (SCC) to capture the relationships and characteristics between GIS and Cloud computing. Pioneering projects are being conducted to investigate how geospatial applications can leverage cloud computing for provide reliability and scalability. For example, Microsoft is utilizing Azure Platform as a Service (PaaS) to support Earth, Environment, and Energy program within its external research. FGDC is conducting the GeoCloud Sandbox initiative with multiple agencies to develop common geospatial Platform as a Service (PaaS) solution. NASA is conducting Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS), spatial cloud computing and Data as a Service (DaaS) to investigate how cloud computing can be utilized for geospatial sciences and how to use geospatial principles to optimize cloud computing for serving a variety of dynamic user requirements.

Organizer(s):

Chaowei Yang
George Mason University
Email: cyang3@gmu.edu

Chair:
John Mahoney
U.S. Geological Survey

  • The Cloud as a Platform for Platforms – Cloud Computing for Geographers

2309 The Cloud as a Platform for Platforms – Cloud Computing for Geographers is scheduled on Wednesday, 4/13/2011, from 11:50 AM – 12:30 PM in 609 – Washington State Convention Center, Level 6

Building the right infrastructure for Geographic Information Systems that can scale up or down in a moment’s notice can be a complicated and expensive task, but it’s essential in today’s world. This applies to an enterprise trying to cut-costs, a young business unexpectantly saturated with customer demand, or a start-up looking to launch.

Amazon Web Services (AWS) provides a highly reliable and scalable infrastructure for deploying web-scale solutions, with minimal support and administration costs, and more flexibility than the traditional data center.

The inherent flexibility of the Cloud enables businesses to use it as a Platform in variety of different ways. In this session, Seattle-based Jinesh Varia will cut through the cloud hype and share some of the real-world customer stories and case-studies demonstrating how the AWS cloud is being used as a platform for innovation, and more specifically a platform for creating innovative GeoSpatial applications.

AWS is not only a rich platform to build products and solutions but also a platform to build specialized platforms. Jinesh will also share some of the unique characteristics of the AWS cloud that is enabling many GIS business around the world to take advantage of the GIS platforms built on the top of AWS.

Organizers:
AAG

Chair:
Chaowei Yang
George Mason University
Email: cyang3@gmu.edu

  • Geospatial Semantics

4473 Geospatial Semantics and Ontology is scheduled on Friday, 4/15/2011, from 12:40 PM – 2:20 PM in Queen Anne – Sheraton Hotel, Union Tower, Third Floor

Geospatial data can be semantically heterogeneous, in addition to having differences in file formats. New Semantic Web methods, including creating or using ontologies, are becoming available to help with semantic interoperability to resolve diverse terms and relate concepts. Background knowledge bases can also be created using formal representations, such as RDF and OWL, to help organize and integrate geospatial data.

This session targets research and implementation that will present any aspect of geospatial data needing or using semantic and ontology techniques. Descriptive use cases are of interest even if solutions do not yet exist. Also of interest are potential solutions for semantic interoperability and the organization of shared semantic contexts such as spatiotemporal coverage and domain specific ontologies. Different kinds of geospatial data, such as typical GIS files, remote sensing data, or sensor data, are of interest, as well as scenarios from various types of geospatial domains.

Organizer:
Nancy Wiegand
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Email: wiegand@cs.wisc.edu

Chair:
Nancy Wiegand
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Email: wiegand@cs.wisc.edu

  • Spatial Analysis and Volunteered Geographic Information (VGI)

4186 Spatial Analysis and Volunteered Geographic Information (VGI) is scheduled on Friday, 4/15/2011, from 8:00 AM – 9:40 AM in Willow A – Sheraton Hotel, Second Floor

Spatial analysis and spatio-temporal data modeling have been a core research theme in GIScience for decades. Recently, large volumes of volunteered geographic information (Goodchild, 2007) have been generated over the Internet (e.g., OpenStreetMap, Twitter) and on mobile devices (e.g., iPhone, GPS) every day, which provides rich, abundant, and timely data as an alternative to geographic information produced by authorities. However, this new source of geo-referenced information is usually unstructured and unverified; therefore, novel spatial analytical methods and models for discovering spatio-temporal patterns need to be developed. This session aims at discussing any novel methods for analyzing and visualizing spatial data, especially data generated through VGI.

Organizer(s):
Dr. Linna Li
University of California, Santa Barbara

Dr. Wenwen Li
University of California, Santa Barbara

Chair:
Dr. Michael F. Goodchild
University of California, Santa Barbara

  • Agency Perspectives on CyberGIS

3578 Agency Perspectives on CyberGIS is scheduled on Thursday, 4/14/2011, from 2:40 PM – 4:20 PM in Douglas Room – Sheraton Hotel, Second Floor

CyberGIS has emerged as a fundamentally new GIS (geographic information systems) modality comprising a seamless blending of cyberinfrastructure, GIS, and spatial analysis and modeling capabilities and, thus, has enormous potential to enable widespread scientific breakthroughs and achieve broad societal impacts while contributing to the advancement of cyberinfrastructure. This emergence is fueled by tremendous needs for resolving the grand challenges of scientific and engineering disciplines (e.g., environmental science and engineering, geography and spatial sciences, geosciences, public health, and social sciences) that depend on the advancement of cyberinfrastructure and GIS and for improving decision-making practices of significant societal impact (e.g. emergency response, and transportation). This series of panel sessions will bring together leading experts from the communities of cyberinfrastructure, geographic information science and spatial analysis, and several related science domains to underpin the CyberGIS roadmap. The development of CyberGIS and associated computational geospatial sciences is crucial to the transformation of spatial data into insights and knowledge, which has enormous impacts on many important science and engineering discoveries, and societal solutions. Three panels representing academia (CyberGIS Research Agenda), government (Perspectives on CyberGIS), and industry (CyberGIS Trends) will discuss CyberGIS fundamentals and its roles for empowering scientific breakthroughs based on enhancing cyberinfrastructure while advancing the next-generation GIS with synergistic high-performance, distributed, and collaborative capabilities.

Organizer(s):
Shaowen Wang
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Sean Ahearn
Hunter College – City University

  • CyberGIS Research Agenda

3478 CyberGIS Research Agenda is scheduled on Thursday, 4/14/2011, from 12:40 PM – 2:20 PM in Douglas Room – Sheraton Hotel, Second Floor

CyberGIS has emerged as a fundamentally new GIS (geographic information systems) modality comprising a seamless blending of cyberinfrastructure, GIS, and spatial analysis and modeling capabilities and, thus, has enormous potential to enable widespread scientific breakthroughs and achieve broad societal impacts while contributing to the advancement of cyberinfrastructure. This emergence is fueled by tremendous needs for resolving the grand challenges of scientific and engineering disciplines (e.g., environmental science and engineering, geography and spatial sciences, geosciences, public health, and social sciences) that depend on the advancement of cyberinfrastructure and GIS and for improving decision-making practices of significant societal impact (e.g. emergency response, and transportation). This series of panel sessions will bring together leading experts from the communities of cyberinfrastructure, geographic information science and spatial analysis, and several related science domains to underpin the CyberGIS roadmap. The development of CyberGIS and associated computational geospatial sciences is crucial to the transformation of spatial data into insights and knowledge, which has enormous impacts on many important science and engineering discoveries, and societal solutions. Three panels representing academia (CyberGIS Research Agenda), government (Perspectives on CyberGIS), and industry (CyberGIS Trends) will discuss CyberGIS fundamentals and its roles for empowering scientific breakthroughs based on enhancing cyberinfrastructure while advancing the next-generation GIS with synergistic high-performance, distributed, and collaborative capabilities.

Organizer(s):
Shaowen Wang
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

May Yuan
University of Oklahoma

  • CyberGIS Trends

3678 CyberGIS Trends is scheduled on Thursday, 4/14/2011, from 4:40 PM – 6:20 PM in Douglas Room – Sheraton Hotel, Second Floor

CyberGIS has emerged as a fundamentally new GIS (geographic information systems) modality comprising a seamless blending of cyberinfrastructure, GIS, and spatial analysis and modeling capabilities and, thus, has enormous potential to enable widespread scientific breakthroughs and achieve broad societal impacts while contributing to the advancement of cyberinfrastructure. This emergence is fueled by tremendous needs for resolving the grand challenges of scientific and engineering disciplines (e.g., environmental science and engineering, geography and spatial sciences, geosciences, public health, and social sciences) that depend on the advancement of cyberinfrastructure and GIS and for improving decision-making practices of significant societal impact (e.g. emergency response, and transportation). This series of panel sessions will bring together leading experts from the communities of cyberinfrastructure, geographic information science and spatial analysis, and several related science domains to underpin the CyberGIS roadmap. The development of CyberGIS and associated computational geospatial sciences is crucial to the transformation of spatial data into insights and knowledge, which has enormous impacts on many important science and engineering discoveries, and societal solutions. Three panels representing academia (CyberGIS Research Agenda), government (Perspectives on CyberGIS), and industry (CyberGIS Trends) will discuss CyberGIS fundamentals and its roles for empowering scientific breakthroughs based on enhancing cyberinfrastructure while advancing the next-generation GIS with synergistic high-performance, distributed, and collaborative capabilities.

Organizer(s):
Shaowen Wang
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Dawn J. Wright
Oregon State University

  • Spatial Cloud Computing Workshop

Spatial Cloud Computing Workshop is scheduled on Tuesday, 4/12/11, from 1:00 PM – 4:00 PM, in Capitol Hill, Sheraton Hotel

The workshop is the first of the five activities to give audience an introduction and hands on experience about how could geographers use cloud computing through our experiences in the multi-agency GeoCloud Initiative, NASA Cloud Services, and Microsoft Azure based GEOSS clearinghouse. Audience will be able to learn
a. What is cloud computing?
b. How geographic problems been solved on cloud platform?
c. What are the issues, challenges we are facing in migrating to cloud computing era?
d. It will also serve as an introduction to other three cloud sessions organized in the AAG annual conference for deeper understanding and discussion

The workshop is offered free to AAG members through sponsorship from NASA, Microsoft, and GMU/CISC

13:00 – 13:20: Introduction to Spatial Cloud Computing (SCC) — Phil
13:20 – 14:00: Example with Azure for GEOSS Clearinghouse — Krishna & Qunying
14:00 – 14:30: Example with Amazon EC2 for spatial interpolation — Rezgui
14:30 – 14:40: Break
14:40 – 15:40: Hands-on with Azure —- attendees with help from — Krishna, Qunying, Rezgui
15:40 – 16:00: Summary and connection to SCC sessions and panel — Phil

  • Web GIS: The Past, Present, and Future – Workshop

Web GIS: The Past, Present, and Future – Workshop is scheduled on Tuesday, 4/12/11, from 9:00 AM – 12:00 PM, in Capitol Hill, Sheraton Hotel

The Web has unlocked the power of GIS, and revealed the immense value and applicability of GIS to e-government, e-business, e-science, and daily life. However, there are many challenges in the Web GIS field 鈥攁dvancing too rapidly to stay up-to-date, too new for many principles to gel, and too diffuse to condense. This workshop is intended to cut through a complex mass of material, provide the audience a systematic overview of Web GIS body of knowledge, including the technology evolution, impacts on GI science, extended applications, design principles, and research frontiers. Topics covered in workshop include REST Web services, geoportals, mashups, mobile GIS, volunteered geographic information, geocollaboration, geotagging, geoparsing, geotargeting, online virtual reality, and cloud GIS. This workshop will also discuss what lies ahead, making predictions and answering questions about the future of Web GIS.

Workshop Capacity: 30
Cost/person: Free

Instructor:
Pinde Fu
ESRI

Organizer:
Angela Lee
ESRI